Mar 112014
 

A panel of journalists who were blacklisted under military rule discuss how they gathered information from outside Burma, and the tremendous courage of their sources within the country. The program includes a special surprise award presented by the panel to one of those “unsung heroes”, U Nay Min, for his bravery and personal sacrifice in getting information to outside reporters during the 1988 popular uprising against the regime.

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Mar 112014
 

YANGON (March 11, 2014) – Several cybersecurity experts held a panel discussion at the East-West Center’s Media Conference today to discuss ways journalists can keep their data and contacts secure. (Watch the video of the panel.)

Alan Pearce

Alan Pearce

“Everybody on the planet who uses the Internet needs to worry,” said Alan Pearce, a British journalist who specializes in cybersecurity. “If a cyber-criminal or an intelligence agent wanted to target anyone in this room, all they need is your email address.”

He went on to say that surveillance tactics against journalists can be used to figure out what they are doing at any given time.

“They can read your emails, see all of your photographs,” he said. “They can even turn on your camera and your microphone and follow you around.” Continue reading »

Mar 112014
 

Union of Myanmar presidential spokesman and Deputy Information Minister U Ye Htut fields press questions after his address at the 2014 East-West Center International Media Conference in Yangon, Myanmar, on March 10, 2014. The questioning touches on some of the country’s most sensitive issues, including the plight of Rohingya Muslims in the country’s western Rakhine state, new restrictions on foreign journalists’ visas and amendments to the country’s constitution in advance of elections in 2015.

Mar 112014
 

YANGON (March 10, 2014) – Jacob Mathew, executive editor and publisher of the Malayala Manorama newspaper in India, discussed media trends, strategies and freedoms in the digital age in a luncheon address today at the East-West Center International Media Conference in Yangon, Myanmar.

Jacob Mathew

Jacob Mathew

With a 125-year history of publication, Malayala Manorama has a circulation of 2.2 million, reflecting a trend of healthy news consumership in Asia, he said, noting that 27 out of 47 Asian countries have at least a 90 percent literacy rate, and the populations of six of those countries are expected to double in the next 30 years.

Mathew said the challenge newspapers face is still how to make content more engrossing for the reader. “Unique, credible content will always be the winner,” he said.

He noted that publishers must also learn how to use social media to attract more attention and elicit reader response. With the influx of digital media, readers devote less of their time to reading print content, Mathew said. Continue reading »

Mar 112014
 

Recently, journalists and scholars attended a East-West Center’s 2014 International Media Conference on free press issues in Yangon, Myanmar (formerly Rangoon, Burma). Just a few short years ago, holding such a conference in such a place would be considered unthinkable: a military junta ruled the country, and the state of journalism in Myanmar was considered to be oppressive at best. Continue reading »

Mar 112014
 

YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and LinkedIn are fast becoming standard tools in newsrooms. But social media merely provides scraps of information; journalism puts it into context. A panel of digital journalists discuss  “How to Discover, Validate and Distill the Best of Social Media for Reporting“: the tools they use to sift through the noise on social media; how to discover and verify fake, non-factual content; contextualize hate speech and potentially defamatory material; and build the right team workflow processes to ensure fair and balanced reporting.

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Mar 102014
 

YANGON (March 11, 2014) A panel of journalists and experts on the Korean Peninsula discussed the challenges of reporting in this area at the East-West Center International Media conference in Yangon, Myanmar. (Watch video of the panel)

Journalists said that reporting news on North Korea, the most isolated country in the world, is difficult, and that they heavily rely on outside sources for their reports. Steven Boroweic, a journalist based in Seoul, said his sources include North Korean refugees, experts and activists. Information from such groups cannot always be verified, he acknowledged, while some activists have their own agendas. Continue reading »

Mar 102014
 

The downsizing of overseas news bureaus and a dwindling number of staffed correspondent positions give freelancers new opportunities to cover stories in far-flung locations. But many independents lack structural support and safety nets while in the field, and communication with the newsroom is often frustrating. A panel of experienced freelancers address these dilemmas with the intention of bolstering cooperation between media professionals.

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